Anti-aging research


#1

Lately I have been reading up more about the current state of the art in the anti-aging research and from that I started to develop the strong belief that in order to cure Parkinson’s disease, we need to be looking at the aging process. Diseases like Parkinsons and Alzheimer are old age disease. If you want to get rid of them, you have to reverse the damage that caused it … which is the damage by aging. If you want to prevent these diseases, you need to prevent damage from aging also.

This anti-aging research is actually quite fascinating and I think many of the results that are coming out of that research could help or even cure PD but at the same time I also noticed that these compounds aren’t really being tested as they should on PD. Take for example, aspirin. It is known that aspirin has a life extending effect. At the same time it reduces inflammation. Inflammation is one of the driving factors behind PD disease progression. So I did a search online:

The original paper: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0143447

I wonder why PD patients are not getting aspirine prescribed already. It is an old cheap drug. But no, for some reason it is not being considered a treatment. However, for anxiety PD patients are prescribed the most horrible addictive meds with terrible side effects.

Now, lets look further. People with PD have problems with autophagy. At least those with the GBA mutation do. So during my investigation of anti-aging research I found out about this:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0026049515003649

NAD has an impact on this process. Moreover, it knows that NAD decline during aging decreases SIRTUIN activity. The whole point of SIRTUIN activation is to mimic caloric restriction. Caloric restriction puts your body in a state of stress that triggers the repair mechanisms in your body going from DNA repair to autophagy. With other words, NAD triggers autophagy. PD patients with a GBA mutation lack autophagy in their lysosomes because of the enzymes in this process has some defect (too small). This lack of autophagy is believed to give rise to clumped alpha-synuclein which at his turn causes neuronal death in PD.

I am certainly not an expert. I am not an expert in Parkinson’s disease nor am I an expert in anti-aging. I am learning more about it everyday. But I think there is enough evidence to say that both aspirin and a NAD precursor should be tested thoroughly in clinical trials for PD patients. What makes things even worse is that it is not like these things are new. There have been studies on aspirin and life extension that go back several decades. Are you telling me that in all these decades nobody was able to come up with the fact that since aspirine is anti-inflammatory and inflammation is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, that aspirine might actually be helpfull and/or prevent these diseases ?

I can only get very mad when finding these things out. Think about all the failed clinical experiments on Alzheimer because the researchers don’t want to give up their false belief that beta amyloid is the culprit. Millions and maybe evem billions have been thrown in the garbage bin. If only 0.001 % of that money was used to test the effect of Aspirin then we would already know if Aspirin would prevent and/or help AD patients. That’s why I stopped funding medical research.

However, I did find something new to support … anti-aging research. At least that part of research is not poisoned by greed and big pharmas (yet).


#2

That’s interesting, my dad was on an aspirin a day but the scare stories about intestinal bleeds put him off. I might see if he’s willing to go back on.

I do agree that there’s more than plaque going on, they said my dad had it and it was causing his PD, last scan showed none. Now I’m researching iron overload in the substantia nigra, I guess any anti-inflammatory that can cross the BBB can help to deal with the oxidative stress.


#3

There are probably other things working for PD also. For example, rapamycine which is also very known in the anti aging community. And this is not a new drug. Its positive effect on aging has been known for decades. And studies on animals with PD have already shown positive results a long time ago. But here we are, 2018, and people with these old age diseases are still suffering like dogs … not because there aren’t things that can help them but because there are too many incompetent people walking around that don’t really care if these people get cured or not. They only care about selling the crap they invented.

Sorry to be that negative but this is how I honestly feel. If they did what they should, your dad would even never have gotten PD to begin with. Check this video till the end and you will understand where my anger comes from:


#4

There is an anti inflammatory food list on the net including coconut oil. Sugar stresses the body so a reduction of sugar intake should help…

I personally wish more funding was available on researching benefits of diet rather than taking new drugs, but who pays for research ? Donations , but I guess manufacturers of medical supplies.

Look how long it has taken for exercise to be discovered as having the potential to slow progression ? How long has PD Been around, ?

Physiotherapy important but we do not get enough sessions probably more beneficial than drugs, more cost effective.

A whole new debate, but do get a bit frustrated at the approach to PD .


#5

Aspirin and other NSAIDs dont look promising.


I favour this approach, and check out Chapter 11 of the Wahls Protocol for MS.

And for ageing:


#6

Glad to know about this. Thank you!


#7

I am sure it is easier said than done.
No 2 people with parkinsons are the same.
If it was so easy why am I sitting hear at the age of 59 with parkinsons and rheumatoid arthritis.


#8

(In my humble and non-professional view) I think the problem here, as babswood alludes to, is that PD may well have several different causes and mechanisms that affect people in different ways and therefore respond to different treatments.

I have read about (1) the build up of alpha-synuclein, (2) mitochondrial dysfunction and (3) oxidative stress, and the (4) natural process of autophagy that helps keep these under control. So I imagine if there is an excess of (1), (2) or (3), due to genetic or environmental factors, or a degradation of (4) as happens in normal ageing, then PD symptoms can appear.

I’m no medic but seems to me there is probably no harm in trying aspirin or vitamin D or other relatively safe supplements, bearing in mind what may have some benefit for one person may not work on another?

I also agree that this autophagy and ageing stuff is fascinating…


#9

Exactly! I also believe this.