Anti-inflammatory drugs


#1
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12925360

I wonder why no trials have been done yet ... ?

#2
there's a lot of difference between things that might stop pd starting and things that are of use once it has started. the little dutch boys finger may have utility before the dam bursts but is not particularly handy once the floodwaters start.

#3
I understand what you are saying. But I read articles about these drugs protecting neurons even when PD has been started. So why don't I find even 1 clinical trial about this ?

#4
dont know! but i wouldnt advise anyone to rush out and take nsaids especially without checking that they dont contradict their existing drugs.
that said, i've always had a strong inclination towards auto-immune problems being behind ps, ad, ms and heaps of other acronyms. for one thing people with pd almost always have skin problems and rhinitis.

#5
Of course I wouldn't advise this to people. But I found this article where it was shown that inflammation is one of the 2 driving forces behind PD. That's how I found papers about the beneficial effects of these drugs on animals. What strikes me is that no clinical trials have been performed.

#6
http://summaries.cochrane.org/CD008454/the-effect-of-anti-inflammatory-drugs-in-protecting-the-nerve-cells-involved-in-parkinsons-disease

A cochrane review. Results somewhat unclear as i read it.

#7
Hikoi, according to this article they couldn't find anything about clinical trials with anti-inflammatory drugs. So it has never been tested. Another big failure of the PD community.

#8
I found it unclear but i checked out the links. My reading is they looked at two areas, whether anti inflammatories had preventative action for developing PD, whether anti inflammatories delayed progression. For the first they found studies (below) and for the second no studies.

If you expand the abstract link there is this.

Main results:
Fourteen observational studies met the inclusion criteria for the primary prevention review (five cohort, nine case-control studies). Exposure to any NSAIDs or aspirin had no effect on the risk of developing PD. Exposure to non-aspirin NSAIDs reduced the risk of developing PD by 13% (effect estimate 0.87 (95% CI 0.73 to 1.04 - random-effects model), but this did not reach statistical significance. We found similar results for the most robust studies. Ibuprofen in isolation was examined in four studies and was associated with a 27% reduction in risk (effect estimate 0.73, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.85). There was a lack of information on adverse effects.