Eyesight


#1
Hi everyone,

I am not diagnosed with Parkinson's or anything else. However, for various reasons, it is something that I am concerned about. I have some symptoms which are worrying but I don't want to discuss them at the moment.

What I would like to know, please, is whether the following issues are of concern: firstly, I am a teacher, and I have recently found it difficult to look at my pupils when teaching. It has been noticed by my pupils whi have made both written and verbal comments to me. I stare at the wall when talking to them. I'm aware that I'm doing it but I don't seem to be able to stop. Secondly, I seem to have some colour discrepency in one eye. It's only slight and seems to affect the warmth of colour and brightness of lights.

As I said, there are other, bigger things. I was just interested to see if these are possibly related to Parkinson's.

Thanks in advance.

Bobbin

#2
i wasn't aware of changes to colour vision but found this
'The disease process itself does not impair visual acuity but subclinical impairment of colour vision, especially in the blue-green axis, has been described.'
but it also says this is most common in advanced cases.
i usually stare to much at people rather than past them, but if you are having trouble focusing? how is your ability to read?

obviously, and i am sure you don't need me to say it, if you have symptoms that worry you you should speak to a professional.

#3
Have you consulted a neurologist?

#4
Yes I understand . Without realising , It might be the non movement .

For years my husband founfd it difficult to hold a gaze , couldn't look anyone in the eye for very long .

I think in most cases the eyes drop down .

At the same time he couldn't hold his gaze for very long . not look you in the eye .

I us to tell him off for being rude .!!!!!!!!!!!

At the same time he would suddenly change the subject during a conversation . I now realise it was because he found it difficult and it had been his way of getting around coping with it .

Don't know if all that makes sense to you

#5
Hi Bobbin,

I'm sorry to say that I was teaching when I was dx with PD and your symptom of looking over the students is very familiar. Also I was proud of my teaching voice but some students remarked that my voice had become very monotonous. As you will know,youngsters are always frank.These symptoms developed over a 3yr. period. I finally went to the doctor when my briefcase began to bang on my knee as I walked around school. I thought I might have had a stroke. I'm sure it could be lots of other things but it would be worth checking.

#6
Thank you all for the replies.

My symptoms seem to be aggravated by teaching. Not the stress, but the performance. Is there much information about partaking in practices which seem to make symptoms worse? Does it speed up disease or is it a case of once you have it, you have it and it will progress in its own time? I'm a little concerned that my lifestyle could be making matters worse.

Bobbin

#7
i've never come across anything that says activity speeds up neuron damage. but it would be very hard to test as change takes place over years and you would need to know whether the person not working had taken up unicycling or whatever.
if deterioration is caused by -
toxins - probably doesn't matter what you do
prion or prion-like activity - pdmwyd
dna - pdmwyd
immune system - might mwyd but pdmwyd

the factors recognised (i think!) in rate of change are age of onset, tremors or not, gender, ideopathic or not etc

people who stay in work might generally do better, but the causality is probably the other way round.

T