Hints and tips for getting dressed


#1

Hi all, 

In the next edition of The Parkinson (our membership magazine), we're going to be featuring hints and tips from people on getting dressed.

Have you replaced buttons with velcro for example, or perhaps you find clothes made from stretchy material are easier to get on and off? Have you bought an aid to make dressing easier, or even created your own?

I'd love to hear from you! 


#2

I have a button fastener for my top shirt button which is a great help. Also I've learnt that because my weaker arm is my left one, it helps to put that arm in the shirt or jacket first!


#3

For gentlemen, wear a kilt instead of trews mr green


#4

I don't think that velcro and elasticated  clothes are the answer, unless you have no alternative, say you live alone. It may be the easy option but not always the better option.

I have always, and still advocate, that my OH dresses as he used to. IMO it maintains his dignity, the person he was, and still  is, and does not announce.....I have Parkinsons. Yes, I do have to help with buttons and belts and zips but, before PARKINSONS he never dressed in joggers and sweatshirts, nothing wrong with them,he wore them at times but not every day; he was always a suit and tie person in his work and won't be anything else for as long as possible. Trousers and shirt every day in our house, no tie unless we are going out. Even then he insists on wearing a jacket although it is difficult to get on without my help.

We had a hiccup for a few months this year after he had dislocated his shoulder and jogging bottoms were a godsend and a necessity as he was strapped up  and, because the carers were only here for a short time each morning, time was of the essence.

 Now it's only me again and, although some mornings it takes him a long time to get dressed,sometimes almost 2 hours, I do not intervene unless absolutely necessary.Tough love has worked for us over the last 16+ years.It is what has kept him able to do as much as he can for so long, not just getting dressed but with all sorts of little jobs around the house which keep him mobile; emptying the dishwasher, putting the washing in, mowing the lawns. Yes, sometimes I am downstairs distraught at what he is trying to cope with when getting dressed BUT I could do everything for him and then he wouldn't be where he is now,I don't think.

He has a long handled shoe horn to help getting his shoes on and more often than not now I do look for front fastening cardigans, rather than jumpers, when I buy his clothes, jumpers over the head are very difficult.

Undoubtedly, the time will come for velcro and elasticated clothing but we will keep it at bay for as long as possible.


#5

Hi everyone, good to hear from you! There's been a slight change of plan for this edition of The Parkinson (we're doing a hints and tips feature on shopping following a letter we received from one of our members), but I really appreciate you taking the time to share your ideas on getting dressed - this is definitely something we will cover in a future issue. We also have our hints and tips booklet and we are always looking for new ideas for the new editions!