Milk consumption and Parkinson's


#1
there is considerabl doubt that what you eat affects your own cholesterol.

as for my self, and those of you of a delicate or even normal disposition may want to stop reading here >.< others will be amazed to learn that i have lost 3kg in 3 days - not of fat, tho there is plenty of that - bit of ...err other stuff.
i eventually worked out, when my waist had expanded to over four feet, and i couldnt bend over that there was blockage. i believe, with 3kg if evidence m'lord, that this was due to ....LACTOSE INTOLERANCE! yes goody two shoes milk is the culprit.
note that milk has a statistical link to pd!
now. milk causes a blockage which cause back up (eugh!) which causes pressure on the heart which causes ATRIAL FIBRULATION and HEART FAILURE.
there is also some reasonable opinions that pd originates in the gut - if lactose intolerance slows down the digestive process then perhaps it sets of the immune system that stuffs up alpa synuclein clear up (AS is found in the gut and heart) which travels up the major nerve route stopping only to give the heart a tweak (dopamine receptors are found in the atrium) on its way to the basal ganglia in the brain.
please note that this is just the ramblings of that most dangerous creature -the semi-informed.
cheers

#2
Hi Turnip

I didn't know that milk has a statistical link to PD! Now that I think about it on the odd occasion I have cereal/ milk I feel c*** soon afterwards. What about soya milk ? Do you have any semi - informed opinions on this ?

Kind regards

Powrie

#3
there is a statistical link between milk consumption and pd especially in men. but there are lots of other factors have similar stats.
personally i think milk has the biggest negative effect on the absorption of meds. it changes the acidity of the stomach and duodenum, it coats the tablets and, if you are lactose intolerant (which often happens people get older) it slows down the digestive system. its also high in proteins that compete with levadopa for crossing into the blood stream and into the brain. cheese has much less effect.
i dont have any opinions on vegi milk except they taste awful!
cheers

#4
ps not suggesting cheese on creeal, though you can make little cheese f;ies by sticking branflakes into cheese.

#5
cheese and bran fly
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dumyat/8432861301/in/photostream

#6
Amazing information for me, Turnip! A year before my first PD symptoms, I developed gastroparesis (ultra-slow stomach) and, for a brief period, had difficulty swallowing anything. I started taking Domperidone for it. I have wondered if my assumption of a connection to PD was correct. It may be. Negative of Domp. is I have to get it outside the U.S., probably the only country in the world that hasn't approved it. Positive side effect: I never get motion sickness!

#7
I too had gastroparesis before diagnosis brought on by a high fat content meal ( fish n chips). It most definitely is connected to PD. There is currently a research project funded by PUK on this and a paper was presented at the PUK research conference in Nov last year.

#8
fascinating - p32 of research conference last year - didnt know about that.
while waiting for their motility tablet - what is the best diet? seemingly insoluble fibres are very bad!
need to find a food that is low in protein, fat, sugar and insoluble fibre!!!

#9
Hi Turnip
Glad you found the paper. It enough for me to try and post not being able to see previous messages without trying to add links etc at the moment!
Yes your comment on what to eat is so true! I am still greatly troubled by gastroparesis. I start the day fine but by evening i notice it? So the main thing i find helps is having small meals.

#10
Hi Turnip
Glad you found the paper. It enough for me to try and post not being able to see previous messages without trying to add links etc at the moment!
Yes your comment on what to eat is so true! I am still greatly troubled by gastroparesis. I start the day fine but by evening i notice it. So the main thing i find helps is having small meals.

#11
ended up having no tea/dinner tonight, have got a handy hint though.

stand leaning against a doorway or similar with your hands on your head - this seems to straighten some of the bends in the canal allowing traffic to proceed.
a bottle of coopers extra strong vintage ale may also have helped.

i am begining to think this is one if the keystones to my current health problems - heart arraythmia, varied affects of meds, general welbeing - can all be improved if digestion is working properly.

#12
Does anyone else out there take Domperidone? (I only wish it were Dom Perignon.) It completely relieves me of gastroparesis. Since it's hard to get here, I've tried going off it, and the gastro problem comes back within a day or two. My first PD doc said it's a drug commonly used with other PD meds, but I haven't met others using it.

#13
Hi,my neurologist prescribed this when I started ropinorole in November.I had to take it for 2 days before starting on ropinerole and then take it alongside,its for nausea and sickness,I took it for a couple of weeks and stopped taking it and had no problems while still taking the ropinerole,however I have now stopped the ropinerole,was only on 3 a day of 1 mg but my legs were considerably worse and my p.d nurse suggested to come off it.

#14
no takers for fasting more avoiding milk and taking what? coconut oil olive oil anything else

#15
Turnip,
Thank you for your interesting comment on milk and PD.
I have been a milk drinker since my youth and always thought it a healthy food.
However, twenty years ago I was working with a guy who took me to a dairy farm to sample the local milk before it went through the pre market process of pasteurisation.
The creamy milk there tasted like nectar; it was beautiful.
I then looked in the cupboards located next to the milk tank and was horrified at the quantity and variety of medications which I discovered.
I was aware that farmers sometimes medicate their animals to promote growth and that the Moo Moos are given anti-biotics to ward off many and various infections.
However, the range of meds in use on that farm alarmed me.
Maybe the link twixt PD and milk stems from the way the animals are
medicated and the resultant effect this has on the chemistry of the processed milk product?
Those Moo Moos would have failed a dope test if they had chosen to enter
La Tour De France cycle race.
They consumed more growth hormones than Lance Armstrong.
Arsene

#16
I agree Arsene, Allegedly mad cow (BSE), started because some bright spark thought:
"What am I going to do with all this chicken poo? I know I'll feed it to the coos!"
Foot & mouth in pigs, allegedly, started with swill from a Chinese take-away (I bet nobody picked out the char sui).

It's one thing identifying the meat were eating. We should also know what it's been injected with and what's the poor beasts been fed on.

And vegetarians needn't start looking smug, where has the fertiliser come from? What has your veggies, fruit and nuts been sprayed with?

And buyers of organic veggie, fruit & nuts needn't start looking smug, Bob Flowerdew, world famous organic gardener, once gave out a tip on tv. He said that he drinks cider and waters his orange trees with his urine. Now if we knew that I would side with the greenfly and wouldn't touch his ruddy oranges either.

#17
We've been buying organic dairy, especially milk for 12 years or more due to the reasons mentioned above about the drugs given to cows. Can't afford to be purist about everything else, but we try our best with dairy since having our children. I had Irritable Bowel Syndrome dx at age 11 when I had an appendicectomy but healthy appendix found! Struggled for years with it until meeting my Singaporean husband 23 years ago! A gradual alteration of diet (due to a mix of our cultural diets) to less potato and more rice and lots more fresh ginger and garlic, smaller amount of meat in one meal etc., seems to have cured me of IBS. Still suffer after too much potato, especially mixed with milk/dairy sauce etc. I don't like milk as a drink though and only have some on cereal, which I tolerate fine. You've got me wondering about all this now....Could all this be linked to my early onset PD or probably just a coincidence.

#18
Silverkins,
Turnip's comments on milk and the human gut have got me thinking about the origin
of my PD.
The origin of PD is such a large subject that I rarely devote time to it, being more concerned with why my PD meds (Sinemet Plus) do not work consistently and how much L-Dopa I can consume without getting Diskynesias.
It surprises me that having seen three different Neurologists in the two years since my DX, that none of them has asked for a full history in respect of
diet or other trigger factors; such as exposure to farm chemicals.
I live in Kent and there are a number of farmers here with our problem.
I wonder do any contributors here know of any research work or medical papers that have explored the subject of the origins of PD?
If we can identify a common source, it may enable the means to prevention or more.
Arsene

#19
I wish there was more discussion about possible causes of PD - I too can't understand why neurologists don't have a huge 'check-list' of things to ask when you first see them. (I don't have PD myself, I am the main carer for my 81 year old mum).

My father worked at a pesticide/chemicals factory during the 1970s, but he died in an road accident in 1979. I have many memories of him arriving home in the evening with yellow/blue/green powder in his hair, and on his clothes. Mum did all his washing (obviously ... it was the 1970s!), and not only that, she always greeted him with a big kiss when he got home from work. Now she has PD (since 2005) ... coincidence?

I also read that having an anaesthetic later in life can trigger PD if you have a disposition to it. Mum had an operation in Feb 2004, made a diary note in May 2004 that her hand shook one day (but didn't realise the import). I noticed a tremor in her left arm and leg in December 2004 ... coincidence?

However, having said all that, we discovered just 6 months ago that mum's brother, who she hadn't been in touch with since about 1970, also had PD. Sadly, he died 2 years ago without knowing that mum had it too ... coincidence?

I have tried to post three times this week, since registering on the forum, but I don't seem to be having much luck. Maybe I'm exceeding the number of words allowed...!!!