Peripheral vision and improving pd symptoms


#1

For the first time in years, I am sitting with my arms and legs relaxed. Usually my left arm is doing Napoleon impersonations. But right now it is calmly resting on my knee.
How has this happened? I added opaque side shields to my glasses that block peripheral vision.
Why should that matter? This is only an amateur theory but –
1) The peripheral vision process is separate to the main focal vision processing
2) PD has a major effect on the peripheral vision which is why we see things that aren’t there out of the side of our eyes.
3) The corrupt peripheral vision has to be integrated with the main focal vision.
4) This integration with corrupt data corrupts our vision as a whole and effects other physically close areas of the  brain that control movement.
5) Blocking out the corrupt peripheral signal should improve our vision’s clarity, reduce eye movements, reduce startle responses  etc
By the way for the first time in years I am touch typing with two hands.
This experiment has been going only for one hour, hopefully the effects last.

Side effects:
You look ridiculous
You might get run over by a bus.

This may be a placebo effect and may not have any effect on other people, but I’m feeling good right now.
Cheers
Turnip


#2

Hi Turnip

I was wondering about this - walking through our garage is usually a real trial, with many stop/starts as it is full of "stuff". Yesterday I was carrying a very large piece of cardboard which blocked my vision on one side and I realised afterwards that I had walked straight through! 

Coincidence or what?

Will try this strategy again.

S


#3

Hi Supa

very interesting.

 


#4

one of the reasons behind this palaver is to improve my driving skills. trying out driving with reduced peripheral vision i found

- vision of road ahead clearer

-understanding of new information, eg junctions felt quicker

-possible tendancy to stray outside white lines

 

a driver's online tiredness test still had me as having slow reactions so no improvement there

 

generally felt better driving with reduced peripheral vision, even with straying over lines. definetly less tense.

 

 

 


#5

Hi turnip

I am very interested in this. My dad has been diagnosed with PD for 6 years now, and ever since I've been looking for ways to help him  with his symptoms. In looking I have come across information regarding blue tinted glasses , and also eyelights. The eyelights particularly interest me and I posted about them in May but no one has heard of them I cant find any UK based information about them and dont know how or where to buy them. But the articles I have found suggest these eyelights work by exciting receptors at the back of the retina which in turn fire the brain stem and stimulates the right part of the brain into dopamine production. They are also meant to help scoliosis which I found facinating because the posture is effected in parkinsons. I would welcome any feedback. My dad only weras glasses when reading but would be very interested to try anything that may help, he is very bad at the moment, tremor is non stop and he is very stooped and rigid. I will have to think what to do. 

i have linked a couple of articles re the eyelights - I would appreciate any feedback/thoughts on this

http://www.eyelights.com/about/lifestyle.htm

http://www.fixedbrain.com/treatments-eyelight-therapy.php

http://www.eyelights.com/doctors/content.php?content=10

 


#6

hi Pomegranite

very interesting

at work, other people insist i have the blind down on my window (!) so I have a small  lamp with a natural light bulb in it.

i also find i feel better in the sunshine.

however i think light only has  small part to play compared to levadopa, dbs etc.

if you want to try limiting his field of vision you could try safety glasses especially one with opaque sides.

i am finding this helps a bit but only on top of a correct meds regime.

cheers


#7

This is very interesting and offers an acceptable explanation as to why I see "things" out of the sides of my eyes. 

With your approval, I would like to include your short experiment in my blog (www.wpgchap. blogspot.ca).  I have no idea whether or not you are correct in your finding, but it sounds very reasonable and will likely cause me to read further on the effect of PD on peripheral vision.  I think more PWP would be interested in this explanation and I have had 40,000 views since I started writing the blog.

One thing about having PD, it never gets boring. 


#8

approval granted

 


#9

somewhat of subject, but i dont get the chance to brag much and it may be the result of dopamine agonists,  i have 25452 views (not that I'm counting)  of my compositions at musescore.com  (id turnipscore). Not quite 40,000 but size isnt everything. 

cheeers


#10

Thanks for the reply and suggestion re safety glasses Turnip, much appreciated