Physiotherapy


#1
I am trying to find a really good physio who specialises in PD in cheshire. Anyone know of someone? We will pay for this as I have not been impressed with the NHS service- v long waiting times and limited sessions, also we would prefer someone with a positive attitude, motivated to help. My husband has improved markedly with the simple exercise programme I have devised (I was a registered nurse) and I think he has room for more improvement and we need someone with specialist knowledge for this.

#2
Hi,

My entire post has just disappeard. Does anybody know how to disable the shortcuts I keep inadvertently triggering? Here we go again. I googled Chartered Physiotherapist specialising in neuro conditions and I came up with several sites like this one: http://www.thehowardclinic.com/v1.html

I have found my local PD NHS physio experience a complete waste of time. Twice I have asked to be seen (The ordinary physio won't see me as soon as they hear about the PD) and the last time apart from saying keep up the good work and not even looking at me - just tick box assessment/interview with a minion. This despite the fact that I have nearly "Gawn oft my feet" as the saying goes the last time my hip bursitis/tendon problems took a turn for the worse. How decrepid (sorryabout that) do you have to be to receive remedial physio? I am fortunate enough to be able to afford to go to an osteopath but a good physio is what I really need such as my two teenage grandsons are seeing on BUPA. I don't get the impression its much better elsewhere unless you are fortunate to live near the handful of multidisciplinary clinics there are. There may well be one in the Liverpool area

I'd be interested to hear the results of your search. Best wishes

#3
And there was I thinking that I was the only one with a poor opinion of NHS Physio's when dealing with PD sufferers. My visit to our local PD Day Hospital left me feeling useless and a complete moron. Did not find playing with kiddies plastic skittles amusing at all. I was told that I was doing fine as I was and to carry on doing what I was doing already and that they would call me. Needless to say two years later I am still waiting. Physio ? No thanks.

Regards
Chunky

#4
I live in Surrey so can`t advise on physio in Cheshire but our experience is that a sports therapist is the place to go. We`ve been going to ours for years. She is very good at identifying muscles which aren`t working properly, or at all, and offers exercise and advice which have all been appropriate and very helpful. Also advised that a quad walker would soon be needed and it gave us time to look around and get a good second hand one.
Hope you can find one in Cheshire
Hatknitter

#5
My previous post should have said I googled Chartered Physiotherapist specialising in neuro conditions in Cheshire and I came up with several sites like this one: http://www.thehowardclinic.com/v1.html which is in cheshire.

#6

Hi All,

Looking for advice !  My body has started feeling very stiff.  I feel I am becoming "rounded" over the shoulders.  My posture is not good at all.  I keep trying to push  shoulders back and improve posture. First noticed this around 7 pm in between doses of meds.  Now it's happening around 3 pm.   PD nurse suggested I take an extra half tablet  of  sinemet only if and when required. When I am like this, my legs feel as if they are going to give up working!  Does anyone have the same problem and does exercises or physio help? (See consultant in 3 weeks).

 

Powrie


#7

Hi      everyone.

I've just been referred to an NHS physio following a fall in the house. I'm not holding my breath till I get my first appointment.

My main problem is the classic Parkinson's shuffle when my meds are  going off. As a result of moving with bent knees and a curved spine my hips are now suffering. I'm hoping to try Tai chi with the hope this will help with fitness, posture  and balance. Has anyone tried it?


#8

My county  is sponsoring Nordic Walking for general health and Age concern seems to be involved as well..   Once you've done the technique training and got your card to prove it, you can walk with voluntary leaders or any other organisers for that matter.   So I'm wondering if any other Counties are doing the same.  Nordic walking (i.e.with two poles) makes you walk (and therefore inclined to stand)  more upright and also therefore improves your breathing, takes a good deal  of the strain off your hips and knees, provides aerobic workout much more so than when walking without the two poles.  I've seen it recommended for PD, MS and other movement disorders.

My hip problems started three or four years before other PD symptoms.  Fortunately I did not believe the Dr's knee-jerk age related (I was 65 at the time) diagnosis of arthritis. Otherwise I might be the proud possessor of a new hip by now which I strongly suspect has been the case with other PWP's I''ve read about. 

I am sure the yoga classes I followed for many years stand me in good stead with the PD - stretching and weight bearing for the muscles being just one aspect

I have not managed to find a class for myself yet but many PWP's find  Tai Chi is very good for balance and core strength lack of the latter being one  reason for slouching..  Related to this was that  I noticed some years before dx that I kept sliding  down when sitting in an armchair or in bed just like my mother-in-law did who I knew had had PD.  Did not feel I could   go to the doctor complaining of this and having to abandon my breakfast in bed habit (!!!)  but I knew something odd was going on.


#9

Well there's a thing! I too suffered from hip problems starting maybe five years before dx, and indeed described them as a "touch of arthritis" And they have indeed got a lot better since I started on the PD meds.

Could all be coincidence, of course (though I've noticed rather too many of them). Anyone know of any research that looks at hip pains as an early indicator, or misdiagnosed arthritis/

S


#10

Do you know I've been experiencing that sliding down in chairs and when sitting up in bed thing for years and never associated it with the Parkinsons!

I've been doing this since well before I was diagnosed. I'd always assumed it was due to being short and fat with little short legs. (What an attractive picture!!).


#11

You asked earlier about Tai Chi... Yes, do it!!  It's really helpful for building core strength, and stability and finding new ways of moving, and it calms the mind. If you cant find or get to a teacher near you, try learning  through Tai Chi Central http://www.taichicentral.com/en/tai-chi.html some videos are free.


#12

Thanks Crump Island. I'll certainly take a look at that

Mrtoad.