Possibly very important research


#1

ever noticed you you feel better in the shower? michael fox mentions it in one of his books. what if the water was stimulating the nerves in your neck? what if an electrical impulse could do the same? what if there was an external form of dbs that didnt involve major surgery? what if this was neuroprotective?

it works on rats.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/271696.php

 


#2

more detail

http://www.dibs.duke.edu/news/research-findings/2009/03/24/spinal-cord-stimulation-as-potential-parkinson-s-disease-treatment-/

personally, i have been waiting a year or more for this. i tend to get over-excited, but I have very high hopes for this one - no side effects, cheap, reversible. whats not to like?


#3

video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0b6OElzJlMg&feature=player_embedded

 


#4

i think you have every right to get excited it does look very good. no drugs and not as invasive as DBS. i searched on the Internet and saw references to this sort of thing back in 2009. either i have misread it or things are taking a lot longer to get to us on the ground than i had hoped.

trying to stay positive is the hardest thing for me.

thanks for posting the info it is good to read.

 


#5

Thank you turnip.  I`ve just read the info too and it is exciting.  What do our researchers think of it?  Is it coming in the near future?  Do you think you would wear the device like the tracking collars they put on elephants?  Sorry Turnip I`ve just seen a BBC programme about elephants.

Thanks again Turnip


#6

Tx T, look forward to observations from Research? What might not be to like? Again, is there any indication that it would tackle non-motor symptoms?

Semele


#7

i realise now i have been waiting FOUR YEARS for the next instalment of this saga. WHY?????????

the cynic/realist would say because there is no dosh in it.

Four years!  Will it be four years before the primate test (sorry Bobo but , well its you or us), four years until the first human (well done Jim, we are right behind you)?

when will these people learn WE ARE IN A HURRY!

perhaps we should kidnap their children.... just kidding officer, no need to...oooh


#8

hi Turnip, have they let you out yet? Do you want a character reference? Well you've come to the right place, lots of characters here . . .

Yes we're in a hurry. But for the right solution. Maybe this one isn't it. I think our job is to burrow in the undergrowth to find these snippets, then lay them at the feet of Research, looking up with pleading eyes till they tell us why they don't want our mangy old offerings and why can't we bring them a brace of the finest RCTs instead. Whereupon i change metaphors and say it's then our job to hold Research's feet to the flames till they tell  us what is the right solution and how they can hurry things up.

There, all done with no kidnapping (just a little singed sole of foot)

S


#9

Hi all,

Thanks for posting about this interesting research Turnip. The team at Duke University have shown that electrical stimulation of a particular part of the spinal column in two animal models of Parkinson’s can restore mobility in the short term.

Although this research may have potential particularly as it is less invasive than other treatments like deep brain stimulation, the team found symptoms were improved in the short term but unfortunately stimulation was less effective in tackling symptoms over a longer period of time.

We need further research in animal models of Parkinson’s to fully understand how stimulation of the spine influences the symptoms of Parkinson’s and its impact in the long and short term. As yet, we also don’t have an indication of how electrical stimulation may affect non-motor symptoms.

It’s important to emphasise that promising results in animal models do not always translate into treatments that work in people. Until trials are carried out in people with Parkinson’s we won’t know for sure whether this promising new idea can be developed into a future treatment for the condition.

We will, of course, be keeping an eye on this area of research and highlight any new developments through our website and publications.

Best wishes

The research team


#10

Many thanks, Research.

S


#11

Many thanks from me too Research.  We`ll all keep hoping.


#12

couldnt agree more on every point


#13

Have recieved an email from the Fox Foundation ,saying that the Food and Drink Agency in America have passed the drug NOTHERA for use .Does anyone know or has heard of this drug,and what its uses are for.It was classed as Breaking News.


#14

http://chelseatherapeutics.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/CHTP_News_2010_5_17_News_Releases.pdf

seems to be for hypotension - lo bloodpressure when getting up quick

 


#15

Having quickly read the link and searched the internet this looks quite promising maybe someone from research could comment.

 

Heres hoping

 


#16

It must be early in the morning or its just wishful thinking but i think i misread the link detail and i now realise the improvement in symptoms is only linked to low blood pressure.

sorry turnip i should have taken a deep breath before posting and read your comments more closely.

never mind maybe another daysad face


#17

It certainly got me going, sky and pkman8. I suffer from postural hypotension, and I am pretty sure it is PD related. The drug I currently take for it, along with all the other PD pills, is Fludrocortisone (2x100mg pills per day) but this, as it says in the article, gives me a BP of 172/113, or thereabouts, first thing in the morning. So an alternative would be very welcome.  Thank you for mentioning it, I will be taking it up with my Neuro.


#18

pckman - done the same thing MANY times. 


#19

Have the PUK Admin or Research teams got any advice on how to access medication that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, but is not yet available in UK?


#20

Hi oldun

Thanks for your query about accessing medication which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but is not yet available in UK.

Before new treatments can be made available to people in the UK they need to be approved by the Medicines and Healthcare product Regulatory Agency (MHRA) – the UK equivalent of the FDA.

The manufacturers will need to apply to the MHRA separately for approval - but the good news is that the MHRA and FDA do work together.

The licensing of medicines is a complex and strictly regulated area. You can read more about it here - http://bit.ly/1fNGvzm

We have contacted Chelsea Therapeutics (the manufacturers) to ask about their plans for making the drug available in the UK and will share any news when we can.

Hope that helps

Best wishes

Hannah

The Research Team