Slapping gait


#1

Hi all I was wondering if any of you have slap gait where the heel doesn't hit the floor first instead of shuffling gait?

My speed of walking hasn't been affected much by it.

The L-Dopa has helped abit and I guess it should improve more over time? But are they exercises/techniques to help me improve my gait?

 


#2

Hi Trev,

 

Nordic walking helps lengthen the stride.  I am not quite sure what you mean by slap gait  as toe first to me is shuffling but lengthening stride must involve lifting the feet more.  Before dx.on  a Ramblers holiday, I was blaming the boots, the speed of the leader etc. etc.  I also tended to trip over unexpectedly years before dx. because of dropping the toe of my right PD side.  Dropped foot is common to several neuro. conditions such as PD, post stroke and MS
.There are appliances to correct dropped foot if physio doesn't help

 

If PD does nothing it certainly keeps our brains ticking with its many manifestations..


#3


https://youtu.be/SWvEU8FYMFc

This video describes my walking best its like I am galloping.

Drop foot could be the problem.


#4

After reading more in to drop foot I think this is the problem with my gait.

Does Levodopa help correct this? I feel I can move my ankle better and flex my toes since starting the meds.


#5

Hello

My gait was very lopsided, and I used to drop heavily to the right and slap that foot down, because my toes were curling on my left foot. I now walk much more evenly because the toes on my right foot are also curling, therefore my balance is better.

Does this match with any of your problems?  I was told sinemet would help, but it does very little.(for my toes anyway)

best wishes


#6

I do drop down hard on my right foot but they is nothing currently wrong with my left foot/leg however my toes do curl up on my right foot.

Walking felt like it was getting better till the last few days it's gone bk to square one possible I am having off periods with the meds?


#7

Bad days come for no reason, don't they?  I picked up my hospital boots on Tuesday. I can now put them on, but they make me walk so differently, all the muscles in my legs are having to relearn their positions.


#8

They to straighten your feet or for foot drop?


#9

If I understand it correctly, the distortion in my toes is pulling my heel sideways under my foot, so that eventually I would be walking on my ankle bone.


#10

Thanks for the video link.  I have recurring hip problems and several of the videos illustrate what I am trying to explain   when I see medics.  I haven't come across anything exploring the incidence of particular  knock on muscle conditions linked to the stiffness of PD.  Apart from dropped foot there must be other muscle problems common to PWP's. which would shorten the agonisingly slow diagnosis process with the NHS.


#11

I would not be able to walk. I have Neuropathy, Diabetes and Plantar fasciitis. When I bought orthofeet shoes at that time I able to walk. Shoes are so much more than covering your feet. Primarily therapeutic shoes that are designed to alleviate heel, foot, knee and back pain. These Orthofeet shoes are engineered with innovative features that help millions enhance comfort and improve mobility.


#12

HI There

The only problems I have with my feet are toes curling and my big toes curl up. Which makes it difficult to get comfy shoes roll on summer when I can wear sandals.Apologies as i know this is nothing to do with what you are talking about.

Keep well as possible and Be Happy. X