Any runners with Parkinson's?


#1

Hi everyone!

I was diagnosed with Parkinson's on 15th April 2011, aged 49. The diagnosis was a shock, to say the least. However, to cut a long story short . . . I have been a runner for many years & would love to hear from anyone out there who is a runner with Parkinson's or is trying to run with Parkinson's ( this is me, it's so hard some days, impossible on other days, & some days I'm just plain lazy! )


#2

I ran a bath recently.....you must excuse my sense of humour. I'd settle for being able to walk properly and further.

Running?

Ah! Halcyon days.

I used to play football on Saturday for one team and another team on Sunday. I trained twice a week.

All I can say is I'm glad I did it when I could, because I now look like a drunken sailor staggering about sometimes. I need a captain birdseye uniform.

A life not lived to the full ends up with many regrets. I have very few I'm pleased to say.

Orphy.....run like the wind, swim like a fish, don't look back, with a wistful wish.


#3

My husband is in a nursing  as I was unable to look Him 24/7.  I am on my own.  His family live in a different town and all work during the day.  I my husband needs  male company to visit him to chat about football etc.

Any one in the Preston area available?

 

 

 

 

 

 


#4

AT LAST! I knew I couldn't be the only one! I have been a runner for well over 30 years. I have just turned  60 and was diagnosed, would you believe it at age 49! See my post in the other section, think it is "well-being and exercise", something like that. Perhaps you could let me know you have seen this before I reply at length. I'm really pleased to find another runner who is on this forum currently. I have found a couple of others but they are in the archives.


#5

hi. Ihave pd and try and run every day, it helps me.  How are you ?  Have you had parky  for a long time?


#6

Hello Annie, Not sure if your your questions are for Ms Overall or me! I also started a thread in another area of the forum where there is a little about me (just search "Runner". I actually wrote an article about my running and Parkinson's. It turned out not to be quite what was wanted and has not been published anywhere. You and Ms Overall might be interested in it but I am not sure how to send it. You don't want to make your e-mail public or you could end up with all kinds of cranks making contact and I assume this forum is not suitable for something lengthy. Probably I can forward it  via PDUK, I'll see what I can find out.


#7

My husband is   in a nursing home and is having a memory test next week. Is this a normal action? I  know he is  confused regarding the days of  week would this give the wrong impression of his  state of mind?

 

 

 


#8

Sarah 1, I think you are leaving your messages in the wrong place.If you go back to the beginning of this discussion you will see it is mainly about Running! Go back to On-LIne Community, then Forum and look through the various categories to find a more appropriate section. However I have seen your first message and would say if that was me I would rather somebody took me out to a footabll match. Doesn't have to be a top game, just any club where there  is a bit of shelter and you can get a hot drink at half time. Might even be somebody working at the nursing home who likes football and would do it for the cost of admission. Just an idea but as I say I think you are in the wrong place!


#9

sarah1 -- Although you've posted your messages in a thread on the topic of running, I can't find you elsewhere, so I'll reply here.  I have just read your profile, and you have certainly been through a lot of strain over the past few years!  It does sound as if you did the right thing getting your husband round-the-clock care.  Just imagine what disasters could have happened if he had continued going out alone!

In regard to the swallowing problem, I have heard of a few other pd patients who had it, then lost it.  It happened to me before I was even diagnosed.  I was travelling in Italy at the time.  It lasted about two weeks, during which I had periods when I could swallow if I washed the food down with water.  That was how I survived.  Then it went away as unexpectedly as it had come.

I am in the U.S. rather than the U.K. and am of no help on the football issue.  But a memory test is perfectly normal for pd patients.  I take one nearly every time I go to my doctor for a check-up.  Not knowing the day of the week can be common among retirees.  A more thorough test could reveal problems or eliminate that possibility.

Best wishes to you and your husband!


#10

big grinHello! I'm sorry that I've not been looking on here for ages. I'm so pleased to find some runners with Parkinson's ....we'll, I'm not pleased you have Parkinson's, but you know what I mean.

So, how's it going? I ran my last marathon in 2001, London. Have done two others, plus a couple of mountain marathons too. This evening I am very pleased with myself for running a whole 1.75 mile route without stopping to walk. Was hard work & by the end I was more lolloping than running! This is a problem which leads to injuries, which leads to no running, which leads to fall in fitness levels, morale takes a dive, blah blah blah. However, I'm finding working with a very keen & understanding Pilates instructor, having regular remedial massage & not giving in to the Parkinson's is really helping. I know that when I wake in the morning I'm going to be very stiff & achy & wonder why I keep doing it. But I can do it so I will do it.

Please keep posting stuff about your running  & I'll look for that artical mentioned by Runner. Annie, you try to run every day? Well done, keep it up! 

Looking forward to hearing more from you both. Any others?? 

 

 


#11

Hi

I try to walk every day and include a 100 metre jog, that s my limit!

 

bw

samdog


#12

Samdog, hello!

There are plenty of people out there with no problems regarding their mobility, who cannot jog that far. Keep it up & enjoy that feeling of having achieved something every day! 


#13

click on research, scroll down to bottom page and watch videos,gdnf,royal insititute REALLY INTRESTING


#14

Hi, Yes I run. Well it's more of a jog really. I'm 53 and started to run last year. I run on the roads from April to October and then in the winter go to our local gymn. And I love it. It has totally changed my life. I'm only running a mile without stopping and then interchanging walk/sprint etc. I used to run in my early thirties but had to stop due to medical problems. Now if I am going into the village for something I can break into a run.

I do have difficulties because of my hand wanting to lurch all over the place so I try to carry something in that hand - phone or bottle of water, which steadies it a bit. The best is when my husband runs with me and swings my hand in time. My foot is a nuisance, the only thing I can do is try to take my mind off it.

How do you cope?


#15

Now I was a competitive runner (though not even County standard long before I knew I had Parkinson's but I am not suggesting racing is going to suit everybody. However I  do feel intensity when I am exercising is helpful and having targets so you are progressing, for example you might start jogging for 5 minutes without stopping 3 times a week, then after 2 weeks make it 6. So we have been told that this is a movement disorder that worsens but by doing this you would actually (in one way) be getting better! if you look up NEIL SLIGAR PARKINSON'S on Youtube there is an impressive video of a 65 year old Aussie with Parkinson's. You will hear him say that he started at a very low level of fitness but he did not allow the Parkinson'  to restrict his aims and he sets small targets on a regular basis.You might need some advice or help from a Physio or a Sports Therapist to avoid injury but i do think the key is  pushing yourself so  you are progressing.


#16

Hi Guys,

I am a runner with PD! However I found cycling a couple of years ago and absolutely love it. I find it easier on my body than running. Running (& cycling) in the gym is not as much fun as running 'outdoors' but it does mean you can run regularly (I join two spinning classes a week). I usually cycle with a club on Sunday mornings, but if the weather is cr.p I spend an hour or so in the gym (rowing, running & cycling) - my own mini-triathlon.

As you know exercise is so good for you, and so therapeutic - keep it up. (link, slide 24)

Parkinson's and Exercise

A number of studies suggest that exercise helps reduce and delay the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Tremor reduction, improved balance, and muscle coordination can be some of the benefits of exercise. Clinicians suggest that consistent exercise about 3 hours per week may provide a reduction in symptoms. Different exercises provide different benefits; exercises like yoga may improve balance while using a treadmill may improve leg strength and weights may help overall extremity strength and balance.

PD is a progressive disease, I see my job is to slow that progression - exercise will help to retard the degeneration.

PS: I am not a doctor or medical professional 

 

 


#17

Good advice i try & walk the dog once a day,may get easier now the suns out ! smile


#18

I am SO inspired by you people - all of you.  I try to walk my son's (big) dog two or three times and week and can manage to slow jog/fast walk for a couple of miles on the treadmill but haven't yet found the courage to road run.  Still, at 66, and exactly four years after diagnosis, I shouldn't be too greedy I suppose!

Having said that, I firmly believe that exercise - any exercise - holds the key to controlling this condition as it keeps the limbs flexible and the mood light.


#19

Hi,

Glad to find someone else who runs. There must be a lot of people out there who do. Sorry this is so late - i don't look here often (just joined)

I have only started running over the last year, having not run for about 20 years (i wasn't great then). I go to a gymn in our village Oct to end of March. In between I run on the road. We live in the Yorkshire Dales and it's a pleasure to run outside.

My problem, which you may very well have is the rigidity in my right arm. It doesn't know whether to seize up or shake. When my husband runs with me he takes my right hand and gently pumps it in rythme of the pace. Not only does this help me relax but it helps my foot out and into a rythme. I so enjoy it and I am sure it helps my shakyiness hugely. I also have weights I use for my arms and do stomache exercises too.

I can only run at most a mile and a bit outside although I managed over 2 on the treadmill.

Would be interested to hear how you cope with running and whether you have any tips for me.


#20

Hi folks! Sorry I haven't been on here for ages.  I don't do social media so forget I'm on here.The Running is going ok although I don't seem to be getting further or faster. I don't mind because I just love getting out early in the morning and I really love breaking into a run when I feel like it. Which is surprising really.

I do find that carrying my mobile phone not only plays me music so that I can run in time to the music which makes it easier, The other thing is that because I have to hold hte phone in my hand it stops it shaking so much. I thoroughly recommend it