Needlework, knitting etc


#1

I am interested to know how many PDs do any kind of needlework, knitting etc. It had always been known as good therapy, and something we get better at with practice. I recently had to put my crochet away because of advanced arthritis in my wrists - I have part constructed items for my great granddaughters - I now wear braces on both wrists and they seem better, so I think I will try again soon. I bought some new crochet hooks which have built-in led lights and can’t wait to try them! Wish me luck.

Knine


#2

Hi Knine,
I’ve just recently taken up crochet. I’ve bought a thick needle/hook and thick wool. Im crocheting a throw. My right hand is very stiff but it’s better than being on my phone all evening. I’m enjoying it.


#3

Congratulations Divine1 on starting to crochet. The thing I particularly like is that, unlike knitting, you can easily pick up again if your hook drops out. With knitting it is much more difficult if you drop a stitch.


#4

Ha! There’s going to be lots of dropped stitches!


#5

Hi Divine1
I would call that LACE!


#6

Ha! Well i don’t think the throw will keep me warm at night! Seriously though im enjoying doing something new.


#7

Hi Knine & Divine 1 - wish I could knit with Parkinsons cos it would be a flippin miracle if I could because I couldn’t knit before!! Can’t follow a pattern it would be k1 p1 drop1 (try putting it back on) complete next three rows, and repeat. It’s something I have never been any good at, I feel I’ve never had time for a hobby at all. I do spend a bit of time doing crosswords which I love but never manage to finish one, I wonder why??

Hope you are both well = Sheila


#8

Hi shefinn
A long time ago I used to teach people like you to knit without patterns. After all, you are just making pieces of fabric. Some got so involved they did nothing else and clothed their children for years. If anyone wants more info I will try to put domething down on paper.
Good luck
Knine


#9

I knit by mood , tight small stitches when anxious then stitches/holes bigger when happy, not great for even a simple scarf ! One of my parky friends does crafts as trains the brain to keep doing those fine motor movements. Got to be a good thing with keeping up the ‘delicate’ movements brain and hand combination.

Keep those neuro pathways active, eh?


#10

This may not be true but a friend of mine said he had knitted swimwear as a child ? Is this true ? Surely not, too ashamed to google it, in case I get sectioned and carried off in a yellow van with a very long sleeved jacket.
Hope you are all well xx


#11

Hi all, i agree that learning a new skill is supposed to be good for the brain. I just looked up easy d patterns on You Tube. You can rewind as much as you like.


#12

I too had a swimming costume knitted by Mum. It was OK, I suppose until the time came to get out of the pool (school swimming lessonwhen the costume stayed down, and down , and down - not a pretty sight, and very embarrassing.


#13

Hi Divine 1
That sounds like a very good plan to me.


#14

Hi TeeHee, believe it or not but my mum also had a knitted swimming costume! Very embarrassing she said when she got out the water!! Don’t know which bright spark came up with that idea!

Sheila


#15

I’m just so glad we didn’t have photos taken. Embarrassing enough in the flesh, but just imagine if it had been preserved for ever!


#16

Perhaps we should have a knit a speedo competition


#17

Hi TeeHee

I think we would have great difficulty in getting models to wear them!


#18

If I thought my sister wouldn’t kill ne, I’d post a pic of her at the seaside in her kitted cossie. Needless to say, as soon as it got wet she it bagged and she ended up looking like a bean-bag (all the weight at the bottom)
Jo


#19

Well, Somer54 we wouldn’t want that to happen would we? But you have the memories, as have I. Lycra didn’t exist then. How it has revolutionised our clothing.


#20

The mind boggles at the thought! Lol